The Ashe Street Clinic, Tralee


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Our aim is to provide high quality patient care in a courteous and efficient manner

Planning a Pregnancy

Any woman who is planning a pregnancy should talk to one of the doctors or nurses in The Ashe Street Clinic at least three to six months before you start to try to become pregnant. All woman planning a pregnancy should take folic acid 400micrograms for at least three months before they try to conceive. This vitamin should be continued for as long as the woman is trying to become pregnant and should also be taken during pregnancy. It significantly reduces the risks of the unborn baby suffering from neural tube defects which can cause various congenital abnormality such as spinal bifida and hydrocephalus.

Woman who are planning to become pregnant should also have a routine cervical smear test if they are over the age of 25 years old. This can be provided free of charge in The Ashe Street Clinic. Before conceiving a woman should also have her blood checked to ensure she has good protection against rubella (German measles). If she does not have immunity against this virus, it is important that she be vaccinated with the rubella vaccine and she should avoid becoming pregnant for at least three months after this vaccine.

If you are planning a pregnancy you should not smoke and you should have a good diet with lean meat, fish and plenty of fruit and vegetables. It is best to avoid alcohol when planning a pregnancy and during pregnancy. If you do have a drink you should not consume more than eleven units of alcohol per week, and preferably not more than two or three units in any one day.  Pregnant woman should try and stay fit by taking plenty of aerobic exercise and should try to stay within a normal weight for their height. You should also have your blood checked to ensure you are not anaemic or suffer from diabetes. It is also worth having your blood pressure and urine checked before trying to conceive. Most couples take six to twelve months of trying before they get pregnant so please be patient. If nothing happens after twelve months of trying to conceive at the most fertile time of the month, then you should see one of the doctors in The Ashe Street Clinic for further specialised tests to check the woman and the man’s fertility.

Treating children with the Common Cold

You or your child has been diagnosed with a “cold “ . The typical symptoms are a runny nose and a dry cough .In the majority of people it is an uncomfortable but harmless condition that will settle within 5 to 7 days

Antibiotics will not help a “cold” and can sometimes make things worse by causing stomach upset , diarrhoea or trush . Occasionally a person might develop a complication of a “cold” such as an ear infection, tonsillitis or bronchitis that might require an antibiotic but these complications usually only begin five to seven days after the “cold “ symptoms beginning .

The best treatment for a “cold “ is to control the symptoms with paracetamol ( eg: “Calpol”) or “ Neurofen” (see below re dosing ) . It is important to keep the patient well hydrated by giving plenty of isotonic fluids as outlined below . Cough bottles usually do not work in small children but might help in children over the age of 6 year and adults . Simple over the counter cough bottles such as “Viscolex” or “Exputex” are ususlly sufficient . Saline nasal sprays or a nasal decongestant such as “Otravine” nasal spray or drops can help with s stuffed nose but these should only be used for a maximum of seven days. Antibiotics are not helpful in uncomplicated cases of the common “cold “ .

You can safely treat a “cold “ at home using the above measures. However you should make an appointment to see one of the Doctors in The Ashe Street Clinic if you or your child has one of the following problems :

* “Cold” symptoms lasting longer than 7 days.
* Persisting vomiting and not keeping down isotonic fluids.
* Rash especially if the patient also has a fever ( tempature) .
* Headache not responding to Calpol,Paracetamol or Neurofen.
* A one sided ear ache not responding to paracetamol .
* Sore throat with a fever and swollen glands in the neck
* Breathlessness , confusion or drowsiness.

 

Please remember to “Catch it , bin it and kill it “ when you cough or sneeze . Use a tissue or you hands to cover you mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze to prevent the flu bug from spreading to others .Then bin the tissue and wash you hands as soon as possible.

 

Temperature Control

If your child has a high temperature, you can treat it with paracetamol (Calpol, Panadol, Paralink) or ibuprofen (Nurofen, Brufen).

Paracetamol should be given at the maximum dose for the age or weight of the child as outlined on the bottle. Paracetamol can be given orally or by rectal suppositories if the child is vomiting (Paralink suppositories). Paracetamol can be given every four hours but a maximum of four doses only can be given in any one twenty-four hour period.

Ibuprofen (Nurofen, Brufen) can be given orally every six hours, up to a maximum of three doses in twenty-four hours. Ibuprofen should be avoided if the child has asthma, allergies or an upset stomach.

Paracetamol and ibuprofen can be alternated every four hours if necessary, i.e. give Paracetamol at 9am, Ibuprofen at 12midday, Paracetamol at 4pm etc.

If the child’s fever does not settle with Paracetamol or ibuprofen, or if your child has vomiting, a rash or is very lethargic with a fever, you should seek medical advice immediately.

 

ORAL REHYDRATION IN CHILDREN

If your child has an upset stomach, vomiting or diarrhoea it is best to give them small quantities of isotonic fluids regularly. The following are good options:
• “Dioralyte sachets” (natural, citrus or blackcurrant flavour). The powder is mixed with 200ml (7 fluid ozs) of boiled cooled water.
• Isotonic sports drinks such as “Lucozade sport”.

Do not give water, milk or 7Up to children with upset stomachs.

If the child shows signs of dehydration such as dry mouth, dry nappies or very lethargic you should seek medical advice.

With oral rehydration, you should attempt to give one to one and a half times the usual feed volume for children up to two years of age.

For children two years to twelve years of age, give 200mls (7fluid ozs) after each loose bowel motion or after vomiting. The rehydration fluid should be given slowly by sips over two to four hours.

 

Copyright © Dr. David Buckley

Influenza Vaccine

As most of you are aware, there has been an outbreak of influenza in Kerry since before Christmas. For most healthy young people the flu can be an uncomfortable and debilitating illness that requires at least five to seven days out of school or work. However, the symptoms usually respond to simple medication such as paracetamol, a cough bottle, a decongestant, plenty of fluids and rest.

High risk patients such as those with diabetes, asthma, chronic bronchitis, heart disease, etc, are more likely to pick up the virus and have more severe symptoms with possible complications such as pneumonia. It is important that all high-risk patients, as outlined below, be vaccinated against the influenza virus every year. The ideal time to get vaccinated is later September or early October, although it is still not too late to get the vaccine. The vaccine is also recommended for pregnant woman and those travelling overseas for work or holidays at this time of year. The vaccine is free for anybody with a full medical card but there is a small administration fee charged for private patients and those with a Doctor’s Visit Card.

If you feel you or any of your family members, household contacts or friends would benefit from a vaccine please drop into The Ashe Street Clinic during office hours Monday to Friday and the vaccine can usually be given without an appointment.

 

The high-risk groups include the following:

  • Everybody over 65 years old
  • Anybody with chronic lung disease such as asthma or bronchitis
  • Anybody with chronic heart disease such as leaking valves or a previous heart attack
  • Anybody whose immunity is depressed such as those with diabetes or patients on chemotherapy, patients with cancer, etc.
  • All children and adults living in residential centres
  • All patients in nursing homes
  • All healthcare workers including doctors , nurse and healthcare assistants

 

Temperature Control In Children

Advice for Parents

If your child has a high temperature, you can treat it with paracetamol (Calpol, Panadol, Paralink) or ibuprofen (Nurofen, Brufen).

Paracetamol should be given at the maximum dose for the age or weight of the child as outlined on the bottle. Paracetamol can be given orally or by rectal suppositories if the child is vomiting (Paralink suppositories). Paracetamol can be given every four hours but a maximum of four doses only can be given in any one twenty-four hour period.

Ibuprofen (Nurofen, Brufen) can be given orally every six hours, up to a maximum of three doses in twenty-four hours. Ibuprofen should be avoided if the child has asthma, allergies or an upset stomach.

Paracetamol and ibuprofen can be alternated every four hours if necessary, i.e. give Paracetamol at 9am, Ibuprofen at 12midday, Paracetamol at 4pm etc.

If the child’s fever does not settle with Paracetamol or ibuprofen, or if your child has vomiting, a rash or is very lethargic with a fever, you should seek medical advice immediately.

Give your child Paracetamol and / or Ibuprofen based on their weight not their age. This will work better in bringing down their temperature.

 

Copyright © Dr. David Buckley

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 36 Ashe Street, Tralee, Co. Kerry

 066 712 5611

 066 712 2626

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The Ashe Street Clinic